Why choose paracetamol (Calpol®)?

Why choose paracetamol (Calpol®)?

Why choose paracetamol (Calpol®)?

When it comes to managing children’s fever and pain, parents are very careful to make no mistake and avoid compromising their children’s health.  A fever is the body’s natural way of fighting off infections and illnesses by increasing the body’s temperature, making it difficult for bacteria and viruses to survive. While a fever is not often an indication of a serious condition, it can cause discomfort in children. Pain, on the other hand, is an unpleasant sensation that is normally a reaction by the body to an infection (ex., sore throat or ear infection) or injury, as well as, teething, toothache, and headache.

Paracetamol (Calpol®) has been clinically proven to be very effective for relieving fever and pain in children. And while clinical tests show that paracetamol is as good as ibuprofen in reducing fever and relieving pain, only paracetamol is very gentle on young tummies so it can be administered to a child even without food intake or if s/he is dehydrated. In addition, the paracetamol in Calpol® is more suitable in more situations and more children compared to other children’s pain reliever. It is effective yet gentle that it can be given to children 2 months old and above.

Paracetamol (Calpol®) is proven to provide fast and effective relief for 6 types of pain and fever in children associated with headache, teething, cold & flu, earache, immunization, and sore throat. The World Health Organization also recommends paracatemol as first line treatment for fever and pain. And nothing is more effective or safer to use than Paracetamol (Calpol®)*.



*Paracetamol as compared to other OTC medicines. When dosed at 15mg/kg.

References:

  1. Autret-LecaE, Gibb IA, GoulderMA. Ibuprofen versus paracetamol in pediatric fever: objective and subjective findings from a randomized, blinded study. CurrMed Res 2007;9(23):2205–11.
  2. WalsonPD et al. Comparison of multidoseibuprofen and acetaminophen therapy in febrile children. AJDC 1992;146(5):626–32.
  3. SchachtelBP & ThodenW. A placebo-controlled model for assaying systemic analgesics in children. ClinPharmacolTher1993;53:593–601.
  4. Graham GG et al. Tolerability of paracetamol. Drug Safety 2005;28(3):227–40.
  5. WHO. Pocket Book for hospital care of children 2013. At: www.who.int/child_adolescent_health/documents/9241546700/en/. Accessed Jan 2016.
  6. SMPC Children’s Panadol. At: www.medicines.org.uk/emc/medicine/10741. Accessed Jan 2016.
  7. Nurofen for Children SmPC. At: www.medicines.org.uk/emc/medicine/20102. Accessed: Jan 2016.